Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

Talk: Who Decides What Is “Personal Data”?

Lokman Tsui from the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) will visit the United Nations University Institute on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) to give a talk entitled “Who decides what is ‘personal data’? Testing the access principle with telecommunication companies and internet providers in Hong Kong”. ABSTRACT Do personal data protection laws allow citizens to feel reasonably assured that their personal data is protected? My study aims to answer this question in the context of the Personal Data Privacy Ordinance (PDPO) and to what extent this law helps protect personal data in the hands of telecommunication companies and internet providers in Hong Kong. For the study, we submitted data access requests to telecommunication companies and internet providers for a range of information, including subscriber information, IP addresses, geolocation data and whether they had shared any of this data with third parties. In my talk, I will present the findings and discuss its larger implications for a future where increasingly everything will be data-driven. SHORT BIO A geek and an activist, Lokman Tsui is an Assistant Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication of the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) where he researches free expression and internet policy. Lokman is also a Faculty Associate with the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. Before Lokman returned to academia, he was Google’s Head of Free Expression in Asia and the Pacific. He received his Ph.D. degree from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, where his award-winning dissertation is a critical interrogation of how new technologies challenge us to rethink journalism. He was born and raised in the Netherlands and managed the unofficial website for filmmaker Wong Kar Wai for many years.
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time:

2:30PM - 3:30PM

location:
UNU-CSMacau SAR China

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

Talk: Gender Studies in Contemporary Chinese Contexts

Zhang Yuan (Noah) from the School of International Education at the China Women’ University in Beijing will visit the United Nations University Institute on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) to give a talk on the development of Chinese gender studies entitled “Gender Studies in Contemporary Chinese Contexts”. ABSTRACT Gender Studies is both an independent and an interdisciplinary academic discipline, which arose from and is largely researched within western institutions. It is worth considering to what extent there is any Chinese-specific academic (or wider cultural) focus on gender studies and education, including forms of knowledge, methodology, and research? Chinese gender studies make use of a variety of international forms of knowledge, which are contextualized in terms of local cultural factors and issues. This talk will provide an introduction and overview with regard to the development of Chinese gender studies. SHORT BIO Zhang Yuan (Noah) graduated with a multidisciplinary degree from the best university in China, and with an MA from a quality university in the Netherland. She completed her graduate work at the University of Macau and obtained a doctorate degree in Philosophy in Communication. She has considerable achievements in teaching, researching, and course development. Now she works in the School of International Education, at the China Women’ University in Beijing, as an assistant professor and the coordinator of the international MA program. Specialized in the fields of Gender Studies and Communication, she is not only a senior expert but also a pioneer and social activist.
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time:

2:30PM - 3:30PM

location:
UNU-CSMacau SAR China

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

Talk: Influence of Buddhism in Communication Culture in Bhutan

Dorji Wangchuk will visit the United Nations University Institute on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) to give a talk on the influence of Buddhism in the communication culture in Bhutan and the search for the middle path in the age of social media. ABSTRACT Why do the traditional Bhutanese avoid expressing extreme views – or clear positions, at times? Why do they prefer silence over speech, indirectness over directness and harmony over confrontation when addressing another person? Are these traits derived from Buddhism – the predominant religion of Bhutan? These are some of the questions that this paper seeks to answer. As momentous changes sweep this small kingdom, the country faces both opportunities and challenges in the era of the pervasive social media. Until 1999, Bhutan had neither broadcast television nor Internet. Since then, this small nation, located high in the Himalayas between India and China and for centuries confined in a self-imposed isolation, has practically “leapfrogged” directly into the digital world. In recent decades, mobile phone use has increased dramatically -reaching more than 90 percent of all households. Social media platforms such as Facebook, WeChat, and Twitter are popular where people share images and voice messages and thus extend the traditional oral forms of communication via digital means. Drawing from extensive interactions and in-depth interviews with reputed Bhutanese Buddhist scholars and with communication practitioners; and from the author’s field experiences of working as a broadcaster, filmmaker, columnist and as the Palace spokesperson, this essay explores to understand the influence of Buddhism on communication in the Bhutanese society. SHORT BIO Dorji Wangchuk graduated in electronics engineering from the University of Bologna (Italy) in 1995. He worked as the chief engineer with the Bhutan Broadcasting Service leading the team that brought both the FM radio services and television to Bhutan between 1997 and 1999. Subsequently, he made a career shift and moved to documentary filmmaking, where he won three major international awards and several nominations. His best-known works are School Among Glaciers and Rocking the Himalayan Kingdom. From 2009 to 2013 he served as the Director and Spokesperson for His Majesty the King and the Royal Family of Bhutan. He has also written books chapters and articles in international publications and journals and has penned numerous op-eds in Bhutanese newspapers. He is the founder-advisor to Centennial Radio in Bhutan, a visiting professor at the Royal University of Bhutan. He is currently pursuing doctoral studies at the University of Macau with the research focus on the influence of social media in news and storytelling traditions in Bhutan.
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time:

3PM - 4PM

location:
UNU-CSMacau SAR China

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

Presentation: Social money? Digital money and migrant labor in China

Tom MacDonald, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Hong Kong will visit the United Nations University Institute on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) and deliver a presentation on how Chinese migrant workers use digital money platforms. SHORT BIO Tom McDonald is an Assistant Professor at The University of Hong Kong. He obtained his Ph.D. in Anthropology from University College London in 2013, where he also worked on the Why We Post project, a European Research Council funded global comparative ethnographic study exploring the impact of social media use across a range of different societies. His first solely-authored monograph, Social Media in Rural China: Social Networks and Moral Frameworks (UCL Press) was published in 2016. He also co-authored the volume How the World Changed Social Media (UCL Press, 2016). McDonald is currently working on a new Hong Kong Research Grants Council funded project investigating the use of digital money by migrant workers in China. ABSTRACT Scholars of Chinese society have predominantly regarded the region’s money to represent an unusually “social” artifact. In recent decades, China has seen a dramatic proliferation of “digital money” services within social media platforms, providing various tools for transactions, savings, and investment. While such innovations would seem to confirm the assumed social character of money in China, we present a comparison of the views of Chinese migrant laborers’ views on different social media platforms which suggests the contrary: migrants attribute a greater degree of trust to the digital money platforms which they perceived of as being comparatively less social in nature. We posit that these attitudes should be understood in the context of migrant laborers’ technologically literate yet financially precarious existence, which gives rise to their strongly held fears over becoming the victim online deception designed to part them from their savings. This paper thus argues that while money may indeed be viewed socially in China, this should not be confused with a desire for it to always act socially. The broader implications of the increasing embeddedness of everyday exchange within personal media forms will also be discussed, highlighting the importance of acknowledging how cultural and platform specifics must form part of our understanding of these new monetary technologies and practices.
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time:

3PM - 4:30PM

location:
UNU-CSMacau SAR China

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

Exploring a Social Innovation Hub in Macau

A Social Innovation Hub is a space where stakeholders from government, academia, business, and civil society connect to explore and implement new strategies, concepts, ideas and solutions that meet the often challenging and complex social needs of different members of a community. Join us for an open round-table multi-stakeholder meeting to discuss and explore social sector innovation in Macau – to identify the need, demand, and desire for the establishment of a Social Innovation Hub. Please RSVP to innnovationhub@unu.edu by Friday the 28th July 2017
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time:

2:30PM - 4:30PM

location:
UNU-CSMacau SAR China
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