Presentation: A General Model of Collective Behaviours in ICT Use

Event
  • DATE / TIME:
    2017•04•05    15:00 - 16:00
    Location:
    Macau

    Carleen Maitland, Associate Professor and co-director of the Institute for Information Policy in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at Penn State University will visit UNU Institute in Macau and deliver a presentation on a general model of collective behaviors in ICT use.

    SHORT BIO
    Carleen Maitland is Associate Professor and co-director of the Institute for Information Policy in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at Penn State University. Her research and teaching examine the institutional context of humanitarian organizations and its implications for access to and use of information and communication technologies (ICTs).

    Dr. Maitland has conducted research in the U.S., Europe, Middle East and Africa with support from the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), IBM, and the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), among others. Outcomes of her research have been reported in over 100 refereed articles in journals, conferences and books. From 2010-2012 she served as a Program Officer in the international and cyberinfrastructure offices of NSF.

    Dr. Maitland holds a PhD in the Economics of Infrastructures from the Technical University of Delft, the Netherlands, and masters and bachelors degrees in engineering from Stanford University and Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA.

    ABSTRACT
    In crises, affected communities, such as refugees, help one another in a variety of ways, including in ICT use. However, there is little understanding of these processes. In this research we examine collective behaviors among camp-based refugees in Jordan.

    In so doing, we develop a general model of collective behaviors that might serve to explain contradictory outcomes of previous research focused on helping and sharing behaviors.

    Using mixed methods, the research finds high levels of participation in collective behaviors of SIM card sharing as well as providing and receiving assistance. We examine predictors of these behaviors as well as relationships between the various collective behaviors. Our results suggest collective behaviors can both extend access, leading to greater ICT use. But in turn this use may create a virtuous cycle of providing and receiving assistance.